Woolard, Wylma, C.: Germany: 1952 – 1959

School Libraries for American Dependents Schools

After two years as a Special Services Librarian (1950-1952) Heidelberg Military Post, Germany, I became Chief Librarian for the Dependent Schools, stationed at their offices in Karlsruhe, Germany. This move from Special Services to Dependent Schools was not without conflict between the two services. In 1951, I was invited by Sarita Davis from the University of Michigan to apply for her job as librarian with the Dependent School System. Special Services refused to release me and recommended another for the job. Continue reading

Stutzman, Ralph, H.: Germany, France: 1949 – 1955

Some time early in 1949, I read an article in an educational magazine about the Army Dependent Schools in Germany. The article announced the teacher recruitment schedule for persons wishing to teach in Germany. I showed the article to Hetty and said this could be our last opportunity to see Germany. I was afraid she wouldn’t like to go so far from home, but, instead, she said it wouldn’t hurt to send in an application form.

By the time I had filled out the forms and returned them, I knew I wanted very much to have a teaching assignment in Germany. While I waited for an invitation for an interview, I got out my German books to brush up on my reading and speaking ability. On the application form I included the names of five references who knew of my German background. I wrote each of them a letter asking permission to give their names as references. Continue reading

Woznicki, Robert, : Libya: 1956 – 1957: Wheelus Air Force Base

I arrived in Tripoli, Libya from MacGuire AFB on or about August 24, 1956. Aboard the plane were several other personnel newly assigned to the base. We were flying a MATS four-engine plane.

We were assigned to the male bachelor quarters for none of us had families with us. My family could only come after I established quarters off the base and that took some time. They finally arrived just before X-mas and the AF band was at the dock to greet them. My family came by ship. Continue reading

Sweeney, Arlyn, G.: England: 1951 – 1954

TEACHING IN ENGLAND IN ’54 WAS REALLY QUITE A TREAT. MY CLASSROOM WAS A QUONSET HUT, AND THE TOILET ACROSS THE STREET!

WE DIDN’T HAVE COMPUTERS, NOR MUCH OF WHAT WE HAVE TODAY, BUT WE DID HAVE STUDENTS WE CARED ABOUT, AND WE ALWAYS FOUND A WAY!

THE FIELD TRIPS WERE FANTASTIC! ENGLISH HISTORY BECAME REAL! THE MANY SIGHTS WE READ ABOUT WERE THERE TO SEE AND FEEL! Continue reading

McDonald, Jean, : Guam: 1954 – 1955

JEAN MCDONALD RECEIVED THE GUAMANIAN OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD

OF THE YEAR PRESENTED BY THE GOVERNOR OF GUAM 1955

It was 1954 and the U.S. was at war in Korea. My husband had been called into the Navy the year before, and after training in San Diego, California was sent to Guam M.I. (Marianas Islands). Luckily I was able to join him, and arrived a few months later with my six-month-old son. I was in for a shock.

The housing available to us consisted of a room with two cots and a crib. The bathrooms were shared by many families as were the cooking and washing facilities. With luck and ingenuity we soon found a nice little house of our own and were happily settled. Continue reading

Pfiffner, Wilma, J.: Germany: 1951 – 1956

Hanau, Germany (U.S. Army) 1950-1951

Wiesbaden, Germany (U.S. Army & Air Force) 1951-1956

From the first declaration that I had been accepted by the Department of Defense Dependents Schools (DODDS) – to the trip across the Atlantic Ocean by ship, my wonderful adventures began.

Three other teachers and myself traveled from Bremerhaven to Frankfurt, Germany, by train – then on to Hanau, Germany. In our blissful state – and trying to help the teacher who had broken her leg on the ship – we got off the train hoping someone would be awaiting us to take our heavy luggage. While we were looking about (no red caps available!) the train started up with all our luggage on it The result was I was elected (since I understood and spoke some German) to go to Aschaffenburg with a German driver in a large Army truck to retrieve the luggage – only to find I didn’t know which billets we were assigned – nor where they were at the Kaserne. The School Officer solved this for us. Continue reading

Horne, Dorothy, E.: England: 1953 – 1954: Burtonwood Air Force Base

Burtonwood Air Force Base,

Warrington, Lancashire, England

1953 – 1954

While attending the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II, in June, 1953,1 decided to check out the possibility of teaching in the Dependent’s Schools.

The very small high school on Burtonwood Air Force Base needed a teacher and I was available. Thus began a most interesting and enjoyable year of teaching.

Some highlights in my memory of that year. Continue reading

Scheel, Lyman, F.: Germany, France: 1953 – 1954

BAMBERG AMERICAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, NORTHERN AREA COMMAND
1953-1954

PARIS AMERICAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, SEINE AREA COMMAND
1954-1957

THE BEGINNING

The telegram of May 16, 1953 began: YOU HAVE BEEN SELECTED TO TEACH IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN EUROPE. LOCATION OF SCHOOL WILL BE ANYWHERE IN FRANCE OR GERMANY.

Shortly thereafter I left by train from Alhambra, California and traveled to New York to report for indoctrination at Fort Hamilton in Brooklyn. After several days we sailed from New York on the MSTS General Buckner, a ship carrying supplies, troops, a few officers, one other male teacher and some 200 female teachers. After an interesting, but uneventful voyage we docked in Bremerhaven, at that time an American enclave in Northern Germany. From there we were sent by train to Frankfurt am Main for assignment at the I.G. Farben building (with open, no-stop elevators one jumped on.) Continue reading

Johnson, Ann, : Germany: 1956: Munich

I had the privilege and pleasure of teaching a wonderful and diverse group of students. It was an educational experience for me, as well as an opportunity to meet, know and share teaching ideas with other teachers from all over the country.

In September of 1956, my class had the honor of having our Opening Exercises broadcast over Radio Free Europe and that was a particular thrill for the students.

My two years overseas have given me lifelong memories and enriched my life.

Copyright 2004 American Overseas Schools Historical Society

 

Robertson, John, Sigler: Europe: 1954 – 1964

A Memorial of John Sigler Robertson: 1954 – 1964

By: John F. Robertson – Son

John Sigler Robertson, GS-9, entered Federal Civil Service in 1954. He began his initial employment as Procurement Officer for HQ US Army Europe at Campbell Barracks, Heidelberg, Germany, from October 1954 to June 1956.

In 1956 the unit was slated to move to France. John arranged a lateral transfer in 1956 from the Department of the Army to the Department of the Air Force, HQ US Air Force Europe, USAFE Dependent Schools, Lindsay Air Station, and Wiesbaden, Germany. He was initially employed as Statistical Analyst working for Mr. Arthur Strommen. Continue reading